Academic Catalog 2022–2023

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Biology Courses

BIO101 Introduction to Biological Science

[3–3, 4 cr.]

This course covers general biology for freshman Liberal Arts students. It is a simplified presentation of basic biological concepts, with emphasis on human biology.

BIO200 Basic Biology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course introduces basic principles of human biology. It focuses on cell and tissue structure and function, classification, evolution, modern genetics and molecular biology. It also provides brief coverage of organs and systems.

BIO201 General Biology I

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course is an introductory, yet comprehensive, study of the chemical, cellular, and the tissue organization of life, evolution, the transfer of energy through living systems, the expression of genetic information, essential microbiology principles, as well as a discussion of the major characteristics of viruses, bacteria, fungi, protists, and plants.

BIO201B General Biology I Lab

[1–0, 1 cr.]

This course introduces the major characteristics of living organism. The overall objective is to allow students to obtain a hands-on experience focusing on the chemical, cellular, and the tissue organization of life, evolution, the transfer of energy through living systems, the expression of genetic information, essential microbiology principles, as well as of the major characteristics of viruses, bacteria, fungi, protists, and plants.

Pre- or Co-requisite: BIO201 General Biology I

BIO202 General Biology II

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course is an introduction to the classification of the Animal Kingdom, and an in depth discussion of animals, with particular emphasis on the study, and a comparison, of structures and functions, and of tissues and the organ system, all within the context of diversity of life as shaped by evolution.

Prerequisite: BIO201 General Biology I

BIO202B General Biology II Lab

[1–0, 1 cr.]

This course introduces the major characteristics of animals. The overall objective is to allow students to obtain a hands-on experience focusing on the classification of the Animal Kingdom with particular emphasis on the study, and a comparison, of structures and functions, and of tissues and the organ systems, all within the context of diversity of life as shaped by evolution.

Prerequisite: BIO201 General Biology I and BIO201B General Biology I Lab

Pre- or Co-requisite: BIO202 General Biology I

BIO203 Introduction to Ecology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course introduces the organization of individual organisms into populations, communities, and ecosystems. It focuses on the interactions between living organisms and their physical environment. Concepts such as diversity, competition, natural selection, adaptation, climate changes, migration, extinction and deforestation are covered. Additionally the course tackles concepts of environmental microbiology in relation to pollution, remediation and recycling of liquid and solid wastes.

BIO209 Basic Biology for Computer Science

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course introduces basic principles of biology. It focuses on cell and tissue structure and function, classification, evolution, ecology, and modern genetics. It also provides a brief coverage of organs and systems in relation to disease and nutrition. The course includes a short laboratory component that complements the theoretical course material.

BIO222 Microbiology, a Human Perspective

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course is designed to provide nursing and nutrition students with a foundation in basic microbiology with emphasis on infectious diseases and interaction of microorganisms with humans. The student will gain an understanding of the various characteristics of microorganisms in general and the specific characteristics of pathogenic bacteria, viruses and fungi. It will enable the students to learn how to avoid the spread of infectious microorganisms in the hospital environment. Topics include the different aspects of epidemiology, control of pathogens, disease transmission, nosocomial infections, host resistance, immunity, and sample collection.

Prerequisite: BIO200 Basic Biology or BIO201 General Biology I

BIO260 Human Anatomy and Physiology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course covers the structure and function of the human body and the mechanisms involved for maintaining homeostasis within it. Body systems, including the muscular, skeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, digestive, nervous, excretory, integumentary, endocrine and reproductive systems will be surveyed with an emphasis on the relation between structure and function.

Prerequisite: BIO200 Basic Biology or BIO201 General Biology I

BIO261 Human Anatomy and Physiology Lab

[0–3, 1 cr.]

This course includes experimental activities designed to enhance students’ ability to both visualize anatomical structures, and to understand most physiological topics. All laboratory sessions focus on humans.

Pre- or Co-requisite: BIO260 Human Anatomy and Physiology

BIO311 Microbiology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This is a course intended for the Biology Major, and covers principles of microbiology, and the impact these organisms have on humans and the environment. Topics include the history of microbiology, a survey of the different types of microorganisms, prokaryotic cell structure and function, microbial nutrition and growth, control of microorganisms and microbial metabolism, physiology, genetics, interaction of microorganisms with other forms of life, role of microorganisms in disease, immunity, and other selected applied areas.

Prerequisite: BIO201 General Biology I

BIO312 Microbiology Lab

[0–3, 1 cr.]

This course explores the ubiquitous nature of microbes. The overall objective is to allow students to obtain a hands-on experience in many of the microbiological techniques routinely employed, with emphasis on the methodological, and clinical, relevance of the procedures. Students connect theoretical lectures to the practical applications in medicine, environment, and other related fields.

Prerequisite: BIO201 General Biology I

Pre-or Co-requisite: BIO 311 Microbiology

BIO321 Genetics

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course is a study of the factors governing heredity, and variation, in plants and animals, on the classical and modern levels, with an emphasis on molecular and microbial genetics, and an introduction to recombinant DNA technology.

Prerequisites: BIO201 General Biology I

BIO322 Genetics Lab

[1–0, 1 cr.]

This course is a hands-on laboratory course that familiarizes students with principles of classical Mendelian genetics and modern molecular genetics with an emphasis on recombinant DNA technology through an in depth analysis of the genetics and workings of basic model organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Sordaria fimicola, Zea mays and Escherichia coli.

Pre- or Co-requisite: BIO321 Genetics

BIO331 Ecology

[3–3, 4 cr.]

This course covers the study of the relationships between living organisms and their environment. Major concepts related to the structure, function, organization, and regulation, at various levels (population community, ecosystems, and biomes), are covered theoretically and via laboratory work and field trips.

Prerequisite: BIO201 General Biology I

BIO341 Plant Physiology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course covers the study of fundamental processes underlying survival, growth development, and normal functions of plants, with special emphasis on photosynthesis, respiration, mineral nutrition, water absorption and transpiration, translocation of solutes, hormonal control, and development.

Prerequisite: BIO201 General Biology I

Note: This course has not been taught since Fall 2020 and will not be taught in the academic year 2022-2023.

BIO343 Anatomy and Physiology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course entails an anatomical, and physiological approach to the study of the cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine, muscular, respiratory, excretory, digestive, and reproductive systems, with emphasis on homeostasis.

Prerequisites: BIO201 General Biology I and BIO202 General Biology II

BIO344 Anatomy and Physiology Lab

[0–3, 1 cr.]

This course includes experimental activities designed to enhance students’ ability to both visualize anatomical structures, and to understand most physiological topics. All laboratory sessions focus on human and other higher vertebrates.

Pre- or co-requisite: BIO343 Anatomy and Physiology

Pre-requisites: BIO201 General Biology I and BIO202 General Biology II

BIO345 Cell & Molecular Biology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course is an integration of the approaches of cytology, biochemistry, genetics, and physiology, to provide a comprehensive understanding of the operation of cells as units of structure and function in living organisms.

Prerequisite: BIO321 Genetics

BIO345B Cell & Molecular Biology Lab

[1–0, 1 cr.]

This course focuses on cellular and molecular techniques. The overall objective is to allow students to obtain a hands-on experience integrating cytology, biochemistry, genetics, and physiology techniques, to provide a comprehensive understanding of the operation of cells as units of structure and function in living organisms.

Prerequisite: BIO321 Genetics

Pre-or Co-requisite: Bio345

BIO401 Developmental Biology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course covers basic human and animal developmental processes. It deals with gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, neural and germ layer formation. It explores the details of early human embryo development and human birth defects. The course also deals with the most recent Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) as well as emphasizes and updates current Stem Cell research knowledge and its application in treatment of diseases and gene therapy.

Prerequisite: BIO321 Genetics

BIO401H Developmental Biology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course covers basic human and animal developmental processes. It deals with gametogenesis, fertilization, cleavage, gastrulation, neural and germ layer formation. It explores the details of early human embryo development and human birth defects. The course also deals with the most recent Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) as well as emphasizes and updates current Stem Cell research knowledge and its application in treatment of diseases and gene therapy.

Prerequisite: BIO321 Genetics

BIO410 Biotechnology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course examines all the biological principles underlying current biotechnology in the fields of human genetics, and genetic engineering. Methods of basic scientific research, the impact of technology on society, and the ethical problems in human genetics, will be explored. Topics include gene structure, function, expression, and manipulation in both the prokaryotes and eukaryotes principles of recombinant DNA technology, microbial biotechnology, animal and plant biotechnology, medical biotechnology, DNA profiling, forensics, and the regulation of biotechnology and patenting.

Prerequisite: BIO321 Genetics

BIO420 Virology and Immunology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course provides an introduction to the immune response, the cells and tissues of the lymphoid system, lymphocyte activation and specificity, humoral and cell-mediated immunity, the concept of immunity to diseases, and immunodeficiency, and AIDS autoimmune diseases and transplantation. It examines the interactions between pathogens and host defense mechanisms (innate and specific immunity), as well as the problems in pathogenesis. The student will be also exposed to the principles of virology, with topics covering the fundamental properties of viruses, including their structure, replication, molecular biology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, and the medical importance of major virus groups and their interaction with host cells.

Prerequisite: BIO201 General Biology I

Pre- or co-requisite BIO311 Microbiology

BIO420H Virology and Immunology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course provides an introduction to the immune response, the cells and tissues of the lymphoid system, lymphocyte activation and specificity, humoral and cell-mediated immunity, the concept of immunity to diseases, and immunodeficiency, and AIDS autoimmune diseases and transplantation. It examines the interactions between pathogens and host defense mechanisms (innate and specific immunity), as well as the problems in pathogenesis. The student will be also exposed to the principles of virology, with topics covering the fundamental properties of viruses, including their structure, replication, molecular biology, pathogenesis, epidemiology, and the medical importance of major virus groups and their interaction with host cells.

Prerequisite: BIO201 General Biology I

Pre- or co-requisite BIO311 Microbiology

BIO435 Functional Genomics

[3–0, 3 cr.]

One part of the course is related to the functional properties of genes while the second part is related to how we can annotate genes and extract their functional properties from online resources. This course also includes the analysis of gene expression data (microarray, single cell, etc.).

Pre- or Co-requisite: BIO321 Genetics.

BIO488 Special Topics in Biology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course covers specialized contemporary topics of current interest to senior undergraduates in the Biology program.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing.

BIO488H Special Topics in Biology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course covers specialized contemporary topics of current interest to senior undergraduates in the Biology program.

Prerequisites: Senior Standing.

BIO489 Seminar in Biology

[1–0, 1 cr.]

This is a combined lecture/seminar course designed for seniors. Students enrolled in this course will give an oral presentation to the faculty and students of the Department about contemporary research topics.

Prerequisite: Senior Standing.

BIO499P Senior Study

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course is designed to teach research ethics and methods, including how to conduct: a survey of literature on a problem in biology, and its presentation in a paper.

Co-requisite: ENG202 Advanced Academic English

Prerequisite: Senior Standing

BIO499PH Senior Study

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course is designed to teach research ethics and methods, including how to conduct : a survey of literature on a problem in biology, and its presentation in a paper.

Co-requisite: ENG202 Advanced Academic English

Prerequisite: Senior Standing

BIO499R Senior Study

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course is designed to teach research ethics and methods, including how to conduct: a survey of literature on a problem in biology, a laboratory investigation of some phase of it, and its presentation in a paper.

Co-requisite: ENG202 Advanced Academic English

Prerequisite: Senior Standing

BIO499RH Senior Study

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course is designed to teach research ethics and methods, including how to conduct: a survey of literature on a problem in biology, a laboratory investigation of some phase of it, and its presentation in a paper.

Co-requisite: ENG202 Advanced Academic English

Prerequisite: Senior Standing

BIO600 Graduate Seminar

[0–0, 0 cr.]

This course introduces students to the art of preparing and presenting research work. Student and faculty will present either their own research, or research articles of interest. Course will also include presentations from invited researchers and faculty members. Students should register in this course during all their semesters.

BIO605 Research Tools

[1–6, 3 cr.]

This course combines both theoretical knowledge and hands on laboratory training in cell biology, genomics, and proteomics. Students will perform experiments that will allow them to gain necessary research skills, and improve analytical thinking required in a master’s thesis project. In addition this course provides students with an overview of basic laboratory etiquette, laboratory safety, research ethics, and necessary concepts in biostatistics.

 

BIO611 Molecular Biology and Genomics

[3–0, 3 cr.]

The course emphasizes principles and information, which form the contemporary basis for molecular biology and genomics. The course will cover DNA/RNA structure and function, DNA recombination and replication, regulation of gene expression and operon function, eukaryotic molecular genetics, recombinant DNA technology, and epigenetics. This course will also provide a broad overview of the theoretical skills concerning new large-scale and technology-driven approaches within genomics, such as High-throughput Sequencing and sequence analysis.

 

BIO613 Cell Biology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

The course will discuss the latest discoveries in the fields of Cell biology. It is also an integration of the fields of signaling, biochemistry and genetics to provide a comprehensive understanding of the operation of cells as units of structure and function in living organisms. This is done through a historical overview of the research advances leading to the knowledge we have today about protein structure and function and interaction in the cell as well as the impact of its physiology and pathology on disease.

 

BIO621 Model Organism Genetics

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course will introduce the concept of model organisms for biological research and genetic analyses. The course will cover current model organisms ranging from simple unicellular prokaryotes such as E. coli to complex multicellular vertebrates such as mice. The course will focus on the wealth of information generated from such organisms and its impact on our understanding of genetic mechanisms and complex biological processes. Prerequisite: Advanced molecular biology and genomics.

 

BIO622 Human Genetics and epidemiology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course deals with several aspects of human genetics including: Structure and organization of the human genome, control of gene expression, genetic variability, mode of genetic inheritance, functional analysis of candidate variance/mutations, molecular basis of disease, and stem cells based models of human diseases. Moreover, students will be exposed to the pipelines of genomic data analysis including gene enrichment and pathway analysis. In addition participants have to present a literature-based project. (Prerequisite:  Advanced Molecular Biology and Genomics).

 

BIO623 Quantitative imaging of cells

[3–0, 3 cr.]

The course will discuss the latest advances in microscopy and in analytical and quantitative imaging and how it impacted the field of cell biology as well as other fields. Imaging will span high resolution microscopy imaging in vitro as well as 3D imaging systems in whole animals in vivo and the potential applications of both approaches to different fields in Biology (prerequisite Advanced Molecular Biology of the Cell).

 

BIO625 Proteomics

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course provides an in depth introduction to using proteome sequences to unravel problems of interest to biomedical researchers. Sessions include a combination of technical lectures, scientific testimonials, and hands-on solving problems, where students will be able to put the theoretical concepts into practice. Topics covered include MALDI mass spectrometry, NMR and X ray crystallography. 

 

BIO631 Tumor Markers and Targeted Cancer Therapeutics

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course deals with selected recent and contemporary advances in the various applied fields of the Biological Sciences and affiliated disciplines. In this case, it covers specifically the field of cancer biology, selectable tumor markers and targeted cancer therapeutics. (Prerequisite Advanced Biochemistry).

 

BIO632 Advances in Epigenetics and Therapeutics

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course deals with the study of epigenetics and its role in both central nervous system disorder therapeutics and cancer therapeutics. (Prerequisite:  Advanced Molecular Biology and Genomics).

 

BIO633 Signaling in Cancer Malignancies and Metastasis

[3–0, 3 cr.]

The course will discuss the latest discoveries in the fields of tumor biology and cancer cell signaling, with an emphasis on signaling leading to malignancy and metastasis. The topics presented will help the students understand how cells operate normally and how the controls and checkpoints over cellular processes, such as cell cycle and apoptosis, are lost during oncogenesis and how this leads to cancer. (Prerequisite Advanced Molecular Biology of the Cell).

 

BIO645 Diagnostic Microbiology and Immunology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

Biochemical, serological and automated methods used in the laboratory diagnosis of infectious diseases. The laboratory part of the course allows for better understanding through application. Titles include: monoclonal antibody production, detection of fluorescent antibodies, Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, radioimmunoassay, gas-liquid chromatography, high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry, time-resolved immunofluorescence, nucleic acid probes in clinical diagnostic, and diagnostic virology and parasitology.

 

BIO646 Microbial Pathogenesis

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This is a graduate course that will focus on model microbial systems to comprehensively illustrate mechanisms of microbial pathogenesis. It aims at providing a thorough understanding of bacterial physiology, host defense mechanisms, general principles of microbial pathogenesis, adhesion and invasion strategies, intracellular survival strategies, antibiotic resistance and bacterial toxins. (Prerequisite:  Advanced Molecular Biology and Genomics).

 

BIO648 Fungal Genetics and Pathogenicity

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course introduces students to two important eukaryotic organisms: Candida albicans, an opportunistic human fungal pathogen, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a model eukaryotic organism easily amenable to modern genetic analysis. Topics to be covered include their life cycle, morphology, virulence and pathogenicity alongside the basic molecular mechanisms that govern them. (Prerequisite:  Advanced Molecular Biology and Genomics).

 

BIO660 Bioinformatics Tools and Applications

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course introduces students to various bioinformatics tools and their applications. Students will be familiarized with genomic and proteomic databases and will gain practical experience in using them as well as the statistical package R for analyzing biological data (Prerequisite Advanced Molecular Biology and Genomics).

 

BIO681 Special Topics in Biology

[3–0, 3 cr.]

This course covers the selected, recent, and contemporary, advances in the various applied fields of the biological sciences, and affiliated disciplines.

 

 

BIO699 Thesis

[0–0, 6 cr.]

This course entails producing an original and extensive research project under the supervision of an advisor, and defended before a committee. It may include field research, be qualitative or quantitative, descriptive or experimental, and in the form of a case study, document analysis, or action research.